C. Alexander the Great

Happiness is the highest form of wisdom

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"…explanations are ephemeral. They are the sword and shield of the attack, and behind them hides motivation. Explanations strive to find weakness, and from the exploitation of weakness comes compliance and the potential of absolute surrender.”
-Andarist, Toll the Hounds: Book Eight of the Malazan Book of the Fallen by Steven Erikson
(Photo: Gary Zuercher)

"…explanations are ephemeral. They are the sword and shield of the attack, and behind them hides motivation. Explanations strive to find weakness, and from the exploitation of weakness comes compliance and the potential of absolute surrender.”

-Andarist, Toll the Hounds: Book Eight of the Malazan Book of the Fallen by Steven Erikson

(Photo: Gary Zuercher)

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12 notes

“Nimander wondered if he had discovered the face of the one true god. Naught else but time, this ever changing and yet changeless tyrant against whom no creature could win. Before whom even trees, stone and air must one day bow. There would be a last dawn, a last sunset, each kneeling in final surrender. 
Yes, time was indeed god, playing the same games with lowly insects as it did with mountains and the fools who would carve fastnesses into them. At peace with every scale, pleased by the rapid patter of a rat’s heart and the slow sighing of devouring wind against stone. Content with a star’s burgeoning light and the swift death of a rain-drop on a desert floor.”- Toll of the Hounds: Book Eight of the Malazan Book of the Fallen by Steven Erikson

Nimander wondered if he had discovered the face of the one true god. Naught else but time, this ever changing and yet changeless tyrant against whom no creature could win. Before whom even trees, stone and air must one day bow. There would be a last dawn, a last sunset, each kneeling in final surrender.

Yes, time was indeed god, playing the same games with lowly insects as it did with mountains and the fools who would carve fastnesses into them. At peace with every scale, pleased by the rapid patter of a rat’s heart and the slow sighing of devouring wind against stone. Content with a star’s burgeoning light and the swift death of a rain-drop on a desert floor.”

Toll of the Hounds: Book Eight of the Malazan Book of the Fallen by Steven Erikson

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19 notes

They both looked over as Bugg appeared in the doorway, in his arms the body of a naked woman.
‘Now really,’Tehol said,‘the pot’s not nearly big enough. Besides, hungry as I am, there are limits and eating academics far exceeds them—’
Reaper’s Gale by Steven Erikson (via toctheyounger)

Filed under Malazan

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Then again, that undeniable virtue between his legs garnered its share of worshipers, lighting feminine eyes with the gleam of possession, avarice, malicious competition – in short, all those traits most common to priesthoods. But it was worship for all the wrong reasons, as poor Ublala’s fretful state of mind made plain. His paltry brain wanted to be loved for itself. Making him, alas, a complete idiot.
Reaper’s Gale: Book Seven of The Malazan Book of the Fallen

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Fantasy & Science Fiction for the winneuronympho:

Brainstorm: The Neuroscience of Imagination
Understanding how imagination works could be the key to daydreaming yourself into a sharper, more creative person…
"…when your imagination is at work, networks in the brain interact with one another. If you lit up those network regions in a brain scan, they might look something like a spotted cowhide. Three large-scale brain networks in particular can help understand brain activity involved in creative thinking, according to Kaufman:
The Executive Action Network: If you need laser-focused attention on something—be it a complex presentation or a problem that requires your working memory, you’re recruiting the executive attention network in your brain.
The Default Network: When you’re remembering, thinking about the future or imagining alternative scenarios, you’re activating the default network; what Kaufman calls the “imagination network.” This is also at work during social interactions when, say, you’re trying to imagine what someone else is thinking.
The Salience Network: This network monitors both external events and your internal stream of consciousness, moving quickly between the two depending on which is most relevant in the moment. It gathers all of the information coming at you and prioritizes it, sending signals to the brain about what it ought to process first.
…According to Berns: “The surest way to provoke the imagination … is to seek out environments you have no experience with. … Novel experiences are so effective at unleashing the imagination because they force the perceptual system out of categorization, the tendency of the brain to take shortcuts.”
(Source: Jane Porter, FastCompany.com)

Fantasy & Science Fiction for the win

neuronympho
:

Brainstorm: The Neuroscience of Imagination

Understanding how imagination works could be the key to daydreaming yourself into a sharper, more creative person…

"…when your imagination is at work, networks in the brain interact with one another. If you lit up those network regions in a brain scan, they might look something like a spotted cowhide. Three large-scale brain networks in particular can help understand brain activity involved in creative thinking, according to Kaufman:

The Executive Action Network: If you need laser-focused attention on something—be it a complex presentation or a problem that requires your working memory, you’re recruiting the executive attention network in your brain.

The Default Network: When you’re remembering, thinking about the future or imagining alternative scenarios, you’re activating the default network; what Kaufman calls the “imagination network.” This is also at work during social interactions when, say, you’re trying to imagine what someone else is thinking.

The Salience Network: This network monitors both external events and your internal stream of consciousness, moving quickly between the two depending on which is most relevant in the moment. It gathers all of the information coming at you and prioritizes it, sending signals to the brain about what it ought to process first.

…According to Berns: “The surest way to provoke the imagination … is to seek out environments you have no experience with. … Novel experiences are so effective at unleashing the imagination because they force the perceptual system out of categorization, the tendency of the brain to take shortcuts.”

(Source: Jane Porter, FastCompany.com)

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2 notes

“And so, does the destination matter? Or is it the path we take? I declare that no accomplishment has substance nearly as great as the road used to achieve it. We are not creatures of destinations. It is the journey that shapes us. Our callused feet, our backs strong from carrying the weight of our travels, our eyes open with the fresh delight of experiences lived.” 
― Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings

“And so, does the destination matter? Or is it the path we take? I declare that no accomplishment has substance nearly as great as the road used to achieve it. We are not creatures of destinations. It is the journey that shapes us. Our callused feet, our backs strong from carrying the weight of our travels, our eyes open with the fresh delight of experiences lived.” 

― Brandon Sanderson, The Way of Kings

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5 notes

The flowering of light from darkness
brought into my sight there on the field
a host of dragons caught
like a crest of wind before the eternal flame.
I saw the ages in their eyes
a worldly map inscribed
in each whirled scale on their hides.
Their sorcery bled from them
like the breathing of stars
and I knew then
that dragons had come among us
Anomandaris, The Malazan Book of the Fallen

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24 notes

"There have been armies. Burdened with names, the legacy of meetings, of battles, of betrayals. The history behind the name is each army’s secret language - one that no-one else can understand, much less share. The First Sword of Dassem Ultor - the Plains of Unta, the Grissian Hills, Li Heng, Y’Ghatan. The Bridgeburners - Raraku, Black Dog, Mott Wood, Pale, Black Coral. Coltaine’s Seventh - Gelor Ridge, Vathar Crossing and the Day of Pure Blood, Sanimon, the Fall."
Some of you share a few of those - with comrades now fallen, now dust. They are, for you, the cracked vessels of your grief and your pride. And you cannot stand in one place for long, lest the ground turn to depthless mud around your feet.
Among us, among the Bonehunters, our secret language has begun. Cruel in its birth in Aren, sordid in a river of old blood. Coltaine’s blood. You know this. I need tell you none of this. We have our own Raraku. We have our own Y’Ghatan. We have Malaz City.
In the civil war on Theft, a warlord who captured a rival’s army then destroyed them - not by slaughter; no, he simply gave the order that each soldier’s weapon hand lose its index finger. The maimed soldiers were then sent back to the warlord’s rival. Twelve thousand useless men and women. To feed, to send home, to swallow the bitter taste of defeat. I was… I was reminded of that story, not long ago. We too are maimed. In our hearts. Each of you knows this.
And so we carry, tied to our belts, a piece of bone. Legacy of a severed finger. And yes, we cannot help but know bitterness.
The Bonehunters will speak in our secret language. We sail to add another name to our burden, and it may be it will prove our last. I do not believe so, but there are clouds before the face of the future - we cannot see. We cannot know.
The island of Sepik, a protectorate of the Malazan Empire, is now empty of human life. Sentenced to senseless slaughter, every man, child and woman. We know the face of the slayer. We have seen the dark ships. We have seen the harsh magic unveiled.
We are Malazan. We remain so, no matter the judgement of the Empress. Is this enough reason to give answer? No, it is not. Compassion is never enough. Nor is the hunger for vengeance. But, for now, for what awaits us, perhaps they will do. We are the Bonehunters, and sail to another name. Beyond Aren, beyond Raraku and beyond Y’Ghatan, we now cross the world to find the first name that will be truly our own. Shared by none other. We sail to give answer. There is more. But I will not speak of that beyond these words: “What awaits you in the dusk of the old world’s passing, shall go… unwitnessed.” T’amber’s words.
They are hard and well might they feed spite, if in weakness we permit such. But to those words I say this, as your commander: we shall be our own witness, and that will be enough. It must be enough. It must ever be enough.”-Tavore’s speech to the Bonehunters as they sail away from Malaz City, Malazan Books of the Fallen by Steven Erikson

"There have been armies. Burdened with names, the legacy of meetings, of battles, of betrayals. The history behind the name is each army’s secret language - one that no-one else can understand, much less share. The First Sword of Dassem Ultor - the Plains of Unta, the Grissian Hills, Li Heng, Y’Ghatan. The Bridgeburners - Raraku, Black Dog, Mott Wood, Pale, Black Coral. Coltaine’s Seventh - Gelor Ridge, Vathar Crossing and the Day of Pure Blood, Sanimon, the Fall."

Some of you share a few of those - with comrades now fallen, now dust. They are, for you, the cracked vessels of your grief and your pride. And you cannot stand in one place for long, lest the ground turn to depthless mud around your feet.

Among us, among the Bonehunters, our secret language has begun. Cruel in its birth in Aren, sordid in a river of old blood. Coltaine’s blood. You know this. I need tell you none of this. We have our own Raraku. We have our own Y’Ghatan. We have Malaz City.

In the civil war on Theft, a warlord who captured a rival’s army then destroyed them - not by slaughter; no, he simply gave the order that each soldier’s weapon hand lose its index finger. The maimed soldiers were then sent back to the warlord’s rival. Twelve thousand useless men and women. To feed, to send home, to swallow the bitter taste of defeat. I was… I was reminded of that story, not long ago. We too are maimed. In our hearts. Each of you knows this.

And so we carry, tied to our belts, a piece of bone. Legacy of a severed finger. And yes, we cannot help but know bitterness.

The Bonehunters will speak in our secret language. We sail to add another name to our burden, and it may be it will prove our last. I do not believe so, but there are clouds before the face of the future - we cannot see. We cannot know.

The island of Sepik, a protectorate of the Malazan Empire, is now empty of human life. Sentenced to senseless slaughter, every man, child and woman. We know the face of the slayer. We have seen the dark ships. We have seen the harsh magic unveiled.

We are Malazan. We remain so, no matter the judgement of the Empress. Is this enough reason to give answer? No, it is not. Compassion is never enough. Nor is the hunger for vengeance. But, for now, for what awaits us, perhaps they will do. We are the Bonehunters, and sail to another name. Beyond Aren, beyond Raraku and beyond Y’Ghatan, we now cross the world to find the first name that will be truly our own. Shared by none other. We sail to give answer. There is more. But I will not speak of that beyond these words: “What awaits you in the dusk of the old world’s passing, shall go… unwitnessed.” T’amber’s words.

They are hard and well might they feed spite, if in weakness we permit such. But to those words I say this, as your commander: we shall be our own witness, and that will be enough. It must be enough. It must ever be enough.

-Tavore’s speech to the Bonehunters as they sail away from Malaz City, Malazan Books of the Fallen by Steven Erikson

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Just obtained Ni No Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch for the PS3!  I am fully prepared to give up my soul for the next month.     

"Pokemon Meets Tales with a Studio Ghibli twist." -IGN

"The witty, beautiful, and endlessly creative Ni no Kuni is a treasure not to be missed." -Gamespot

"It is easy to look at Ni no Kuni and come to the conclusion that it’s a game intended for children. After all, it has a cartoony cel-shaded visual style and is animated by Studio Ghibli, the animation studio sometimes dubbed "the Japanese Disney" that is behind animated films such as Spirited Away and My Neighbor Totoro. The protagonist is a young boy traveling through a fantasy land of magic. However, there is much more to Ni no Kuni than meets the eye, and hopefully by the end of the review you’ll be convinced not only that the game is far from a kid’s movie in game form, but also that it is a deep, rewarding, fantastic experience that holds its own against any modern RPG title…" -Egheadfool

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